Spring Survey Results!

Spring 2019 Survey Results

Our spring survey results highlight just how busy Australia’s backyards have been! We can never thank you enough for the effort that you put in to collecting this data, taking part in these surveys and for your engagement with your local wildlife. Without your help, our jobs would be tremendously harder!

Over the months of September and October 2019 you spent a total of 291 hours in your backyards, that’s huge! Think of all that vitamin D you soaked up. Not only is this a 33% increase from the spring 2018 surveys, it is also a 39% increase from our winter 2019 surveys held in June and July (157 hours). However, this isn’t too surprising seeming as the weather is far more welcoming now! Another encouraging sign is that the average number of observers per survey has increased too, meaning your efforts to involve family, friends, neighbours and anyone else who listened, has really paid off!

When we look deeper, we also seem to have a lucky number on our hands because the total number of surveys also increased by 33% since our Spring 2018 surveys! The 873 spring surveys helped count 36,844 individuals, representing 306 species, over a total of 326 sites across the country. Now let us look at what you counted…

Top 10

The top 10 birds in spring were:

Rank

Common Name

1

Rainbow Lorikeet

2

Noisy Miner

3

Australian Magpie

4

Crested Pigeon

5

Magpie-lark

6

Pied Currawong

7

Red Wattlebird

8

Welcome Swallow

9

Willie Wagtail

10

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo

 

Word is obviously getting around about these surveys since the winter 2019 surveys there has been a little rearranging our top 10. The usual suspects are number one, the bold and beautiful Rainbow Lorikeets… maybe don’t tell them though because it may only make them more outspoken!

The Noisy Miner has pushed the Magpie into third place this spring while the contenders for 4th, 5th and 6th place still hold strong. However, the Red Wattlebird has made an appearance from 14th to 7th place since our winter survey. The prize for most improved though must go to the Welcome Swallow who jumped from 25th in winter to 8th place in spring, pushing out the Spotted Dove from 10th place on the way. Now that is a comeback.

Our noisy neighbours, the Sulphur-crested Cockatoo, has dropped all the way to 10th place from 7th and the Laughing Kookaburra has been pushed out of the picture altogether by the Willie Wagtail. The Common (Indian) Myna has also had a dramatic fall from grace from 10th to 17th position in the spring surveys.

How does this compare to our spring 2018 survey?

Rank

2018

2019

1

Australian Magpie

Rainbow Lorikeet

2

Rainbow Lorikeet

Noisy Miner

3

Red Wattlebird

Australian Magpie

4

Magpie-Lark

Crested Pigeon

5

Noisy Miner

Magpie-lark

6

Common Blackbird

Pied Currawong

7

Willie Wagtail

Red Wattlebird

8

Crested Pigeon

Welcome Swallow

9

Galah

Willie Wagtail

10

Welcome Swallow

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo

 

As you can see, there have been a few changes since last spring. Our beloved Magpies have been relegated to third place and the Common Blackbird and Galah have been knocked out of the race altogether. However, we are still seeing some of the same species hanging around our backyards and urban green spaces.
 

Spring Frenzy

As is common knowledge, spring is a time of great change and activity. Our flowers are blooming, the birds are beginning to nest and there is a general magic in the air as everything sheds its winter clothing and embraces the more welcoming temperatures.

The Rainbow Lorikeets, Noisy Miners and Red Wattlebirds will be particularly happy about the nectar rich trees, shrubs and plants that line our streets and fill our gardens. As popular hybrid Grevillias and other nectar rich flora comes into bloom, the more aggressive and louder species tend to make more of an appearance, normally to the detriment of our less brash and smaller birds.

Spring is also a time of movement and the Welcome Swallows have been making their way back down south from their northern winter holidays. The Red Wattlebirds will also be moving around during this seasonal period as they search for food and you may have seen them on their travels through your local area.

 

 and @UrbanBirdsOz  @birdsinbackyards
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