Baby magpie

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rmjagreer@gmail.com's picture
Baby magpie

A young magpie was on the ground.  It had some adult feathers, but no tail feathers so it couldn't fly.  It was being attacked by other adult magpies.

So I rescued it and moved it into a small chook run that protected it.  We then for the next week fed it with small pieces on meat (left over sausage, thinly slice beef and ham).  Unfortunately, it died yesterday.  

Clearly, we didn't get something right as it had been OK and was starting to jump up on things and spread its wings.  

Any advice for future reference 

Rod 

Holly
Holly's picture

Hi Rod

Very sad news. Strange that it was being attacked by other magpies - there may have been an underlying illness. In the future (if a baby is not being attacked):

  • If it is feathered but not flying, pop it into a nearby tree. Mum and dad will still be around somewhere and keep feeding it.
  • If that is not possible and if it is injured, put it into a box (with air holes) and keep it quiet and dark. Either take the bird to your local vet or contact your local wildlife rescue group for them to come and collect it. I usually find it is quickest to take the bird straight to the vet as they then release it to wildlife rescue after the vet work is done. 
  • Best not to feed the birds in case they need a proceedure done at the vets. Magpies are also largely insectivorous so a more natural diet of insects is better for them than meat.

Hope this helps and thank you for trying to help this bird. Birds are notoriously difficult to care for and can often die suddenly for no apparent reason (usually stress related). Best given straight to the experts wherever possible.

We have rescue contacts listed on the FAQ section of the website too.

 

Cheers

Holly

 

dwatsonbb
dwatsonbb's picture

Hi Rod, thanks for trying. We do wildlife rescue, and the advice Holly has given is 100% correct. The same principle applies to all wildlife, keep them safe, warm and dry and in a quiet, darkened environment, do not feed or offer fluids, unless advised by the rescue Organisation to do so. Holly also has a thread in this section, worth a read, and maybe store the closest contact in your mobile. Thanks again, and better luck next time.
http://www.birdsinbackyards.net/forum/Bird-rescuerehabilitation/What-do-if-you-find-injuredsick-bird-check-here-first

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

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Holly wrote:

Hi Rod

Very sad news. Strange that it was being attacked by other magpies - there may have been an underlying illness. In the future (if a baby is not being attacked)

I see juvenile magpies being attacked by adults all the time during/in the breeding season,luckily none have ended in a death so far. I thought this behaviour was quite common, but apparently it's not? Doesn't this happen in the Eastern States?

Woko
Woko's picture

Magpies have very complex social arrangements. I'd be very wary of "rescuing" a young magpie from adult magpie attack as you may be interfering in some social behaviour that is important for the well-being of the magpie group/family.

Holly
Holly's picture

NathanY wrote:

 

 

Holly wrote:

Hi Rod

Very sad news. Strange that it was being attacked by other magpies - there may have been an underlying illness. In the future (if a baby is not being attacked)

 

I see juvenile magpies being attacked by adults all the time during/in the breeding season,luckily none have ended in a death so far. I thought this behaviour was quite common, but apparently it's not? Doesn't this happen in the Eastern States?

 

No they certainly do attack young birds during the breeding season, the description just seemed like this bird was a little younger than what I would expect given it wasn't flying etc. I very well could be wrong though.

It is really hard to know when to interfere and when to let nature take its course...

 

 

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