2nd day with the A700

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Raoul
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2nd day with the A700

First shot of a Spotted Dove with the new camera and couple of shots of the Red Tailed Black Cockatoo.

Tassie

Gidday Raoul,lovely shots there mate,the new camera is working well for you.

Gelmir
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Love the Dove, keep em coming.

tarkineus
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Clean and sharp Raoul - have you post processed these or are they straight out of the camera?

Regards, "Tark" - Olympus 4/3rds colour

GeorgeP
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Beautiful shots, Raoul. I love those R-t B-C.

Cheers,

George
Melbourne, VIC

Raoul
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Thanks guys, Tark the only thing done to them is resizing and cropping..

tarkineus
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Thanks Raoul, my reason for asking was prompted by the exceptionally saturated colours.

Regards, "Tark" - Olympus 4/3rds colour

Raoul
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Tark this camera has these settings...standard, vivid, neutral, adobe RGB its on vivid right now, i will take a pic of the shed in my backyard and try out all the other settings.

tarkineus
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I figured your A700 must have those settings and that you had either selected "vivid" or that it was the factory default. My E-520 saturation level is set on "Natural". I'm not saying that yours should be, it's a personal preference. From what you've posted so far I'd say the A700 is right up there among the best.

Regards, "Tark" - Olympus 4/3rds colour

smeedingo2
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HI Raoul
very nice mate love the RTB there is some big gum nuts there is it a native gum.

Birdgirl2009
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Great shots of a great bird (r-t b-c) - especially the flight shot showing the bars on the tail panel.

Raoul
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Smeedingo its a native tree of W.A

Marri is usually a large tree to 40 metres but can take mallee form on poor sites. It bursts into prominent cream flowers, held outside the canopy, in mid-summer - despite this being in the middle of a rainless period in the mediterranean climate of its native habitat. The bark is rough (tessellated), brown to grey-brown, and often has exudations of reddish gum (kino). Its common name "Marri" is from the Nyoongar word for blood - applying to the gum.

Marri occurs in a range of habitats. It is an important component of both the Jarrah and Karri forests of Western Australia. It also occurs on the coastal plain on a range of soils.

The nuts are large and carry rather large seeds that provide an important food source for some species of parrots including cockatoos. They are commonly called "Honkey nuts" in Western Australia - allegedly a corruption of hockey nuts because of their use in a game.

Marri is superficially similar to Corymbia ficifolia. It differs in that it has urn-shaped fruit rather than barrel shaped, its seeds are larger and do not have wings, and its oil glands in the leaves are prominent. It crosses readily with Corymbia ficifolia. The hybrids are intermediate in these characters and often set fewer nuts. Pink-flowering hybrids occur but there is also a rare form of true Marri which is also pink flowered.

smeedingo2
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Thanks Raoul
I will try and track some down to plant in the yard Thanks again.

 and @UrbanBirdsOz  @birdsinbackyards
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