Robins.

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GeorgeP
GeorgeP's picture
Robins.

A couple of weeks ago there was a report of large numbers of Flame and Red-capped Robins at Woodlands Historic Park which is located just north of Melbourne airport. Owen kindly gave me some detailed instructions on where to find them and today I spent a couple of hours photographing them. The Flames were not very co-operative but the Red-capped more than made up for that. Although close-ups of these gorgeous birds are nice to get, I reckon the two wider shots accurately show the birds' tiny size. Thanks for viewing.
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Cheers,
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George
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Flame Robin (male).

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Red-capped Robin (male).

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Red-capped Robin (male).

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Red-capped Robin (male).

birdie
birdie's picture

Oh I love the way the widest shot shows the brightness of the little red breast....they are all beautiful shots that show the character and detail of these lovely little birds . Great to see!

Sunshine Coast Queensland

Owen1
Owen1's picture

WOW George! You did a lot better than I did! I'm happy you found the Robins because they are such great birds. My Flames weren't too co-operative either. They were hunting in the grass and gradually moving away.

Cheers, Owen.

mrtattoo
mrtattoo's picture

Wow the red is so briliant. your right the widest pics really do give a good perspective on their size. thanks for sharin!!

if your happy when your birding, flap your wings.

cathshane

Great shots George, have been past Woodlands many times, think we better go in and have a look.

GeorgeP
GeorgeP's picture

Thanks everyone for the kind comments.
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@ cathshane If you do drop in, enter via the entrance off Providence Rd, walk past the cemetery (on your LHS) and through the gated fence into the reserve. I found them in the woodland immediately behind the info shelter.

Cheers,

George
Melbourne, VIC

cathshane

Thanks George, the next time we go to see my parents (they are in Sunbury) we will call in.

Araminta
Araminta's picture

What do you mean, walk past the Aboriginal Cemetery? It is one of the best places I have ever been to, just beautiful !! (but be respectful) All the birds you could be looking for, are right there. I took lots of photos of dif. Robins, and huge mobs of Kangaroos, on Sunday. They are all in the cemetery. M-L

M-L

GeorgeP
GeorgeP's picture

Thanks for the info., Marie-Louise. I was just giving them a summary of where I found them and where Owen had found them. I'll have a look around the cemetery next time and look forward to seeing your shots.
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Cheers,
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George

Cheers,

George
Melbourne, VIC

Tassie

Beautiful shots mate.

Woko
Woko's picture

In SA many of our cemeteries are the last resting place of the local native vegetation. Hence they can be the repository of the few remaining native birds in an area, with a bit of luck. As well they might be good stopover places for migrating birds. I don't know if anyone has researched this but it might be worthwhile.

Araminta
Araminta's picture

I love the way you are putting this: the last resting place for native vegetation. I have noticed the same thing in Europe.I used to take the children for walks in the cemetery for the same reason. It was quiet, there were beautiful trees, and lots of birds. Later I used to take a book, to sit and read! You could find birds you couldn't find anywhere else anymore. I think, because there are no cars, no bikes, no noise... and some respect,even if it is mainly for the dead. But nature benefits from it!

M-L

Woko
Woko's picture

Nice to hear of your European cemetery experience, Araminta.
Our local cemetery is a Bush for Life site where a couple of bushcarers use minimum disturbance techniques to restore the remnant bush there. The biggest threat to the cemetery's native bush are the adjacent Aleppo pines which regenerate madly. Their saving grace is that they provide food for the yellow-tailed & sulphur crested cockatoos.
Of course, a major threat to the bush is the number of people who die & take up space there! Very inconsiderate of them! Perhaps there's a need to recycle grave sites to help save the bush & the birds which inhabit it.

Araminta
Araminta's picture

Woko,I have no idea, how they do it in Australia? In Europe, graves are recicled(LOL), people are put on top of eachother in graces! They bury people standing up now!That saves space.Graces get recicled after 15 years.I do like the bush for life idea!! Sorry, George to use your thread for this "morbid" discussion! M-L

M-L

GeorgeP
GeorgeP's picture

Good point, Woko. My other interest is native terrestrial orchids and many rare or uncommon species are found in cemetaries.

Cheers,

George
Melbourne, VIC

Woko
Woko's picture

Fortunately, Araminta, I have no first hand experience of how they do it in Australia. No doubt I'll find out in due course.
And good on you for your interest in native terrestrial orchids, GeorgeP. I've just planted my first 2 species on our block. There are insects attracted by orchids & the insects attract some bird species, including robins (just to bring this back to the original thread!)See, it all fits together!

Araminta
Araminta's picture

Just a quick story from the Woodlands. As my (poor?) husband is getting older, his hearing isn't as sharp as it used to be, so unfortunately those little Robins can sing all they want, he can't hear them! (I know that!). In the cemetery I heard a Whistling Kite fly over, suddenly there was no bird singing anymore , dead quiet, nothing even moved. I said to my husband: Do you hear that?? (I was thinking of the silence!) His answer came very quickly: O yes,I hear lots of little Robins!!! Hearing Aid, here I come! LOL

M-L

Birdgirl2009
Birdgirl2009's picture

Love them all. Isn't the red brilliant?

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