Juvenile Honeyeater rescue.

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jennikay
jennikay's picture
Juvenile Honeyeater rescue.

Hi all,
I just found two juvenile White Plumed Honeyeaters in the airlock of our Finch aviary. I assume some cats scared them into the airlock. I have brought them inside and placed them in a small cage with a lamp for warmth. They both had one foot with dried blood, and this is the only visible injury. I would certainly like some advice on what to do with them. At present, I was going to keep them inside overnight, offer some Lorikeet food, and release them tomorrow if they appear to be OK. But since I have NEVER rescued Honeyeaters before, I am uncertain what is best to do.

All advice welcome,
Jenni
South Australia.

bushanwater
bushanwater's picture

I suggest wildlife rescue in the phone book. If you must keep them yourself I understand keeping them in a dark place is best because it reduces the stress. Warmth may be more inportant than dark at this time of year but I would certainly suggest ringing Wildlife Rescue because you are unsure.

See Yez
Trev

debbie
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Jenni, like you I have had to try and rescue birds and it is distressing to say the least as to what to do with an injured bird. I live on a property a distance from town, so I don't have access to wildlife rescuers, plus the practicality of it is, if I don't save them, they won't be saved. Generally, and fortunately for me, I have only needed to keep them overnight at the most, because they usually knock themselves out flying too low, or smashing into our windows.

The important thing in my area, is that I have to get the cage up off the ground, and hang it, or otherwise, with the slightest smell of blood, the ants come in the droves. At the top of the wire that hangs the cage, I wipe a large amount of olive oil around it to deter the ants. (We find that ants don't like swimming in oil!)

I am always interested in what needs to be done to rescue birds as well.

Debbie

Debbie Bray

jennikay
jennikay's picture

I did phone the local Bird Care group, and they were no help at all. They don't take in birds anymore, and all they could suggest was to refer me to a third party. This person only suggested I keep doing what I was already doing. Unfortunately, both birds died. I still don't know what went wrong. They were both eating the food I offered, but I don't know if this was adequate enough. Maybe they had internal injuries, but they were active enough and I thought they were going to be OK. So I don't know what went wrong, and will be again very uncertain the next time this happens. I have rescued some other wild birds before, keeping them over night and releasing them the next day. But I was just looking for advice since I knew I had to keep these little guys a little longer.
Cheers

bushanwater
bushanwater's picture

pretty sad that your local bird care group weren't interested. We have a vet in Bundy that takes injured wildlife off your hands and arranges pickup by WIRES (wildlife rescue). Perhaps your parks and wildlife Dept can help with contacts for both Wildlife rescue or (and it looks like your a long way from them) someone you can ring for advise if/when you do find and injured animal.
My dad had a book called "caring for sick and injured wildlife". I will see if he still has it so I can find publisher/author etc for you and post info.

See Yez
Trev

bushanwater
bushanwater's picture

Forgot to add. I have watched a few injured birds die myself in my time but seen some live so all we can do is try, at least some of them make it that way.

See Yez
Trev

jennikay
jennikay's picture

I have had success with the wildlife group for injured animals, but it is very difficult to find help for birds. The local vet takes in injured birds, and I am one of the carers they phone to look after birds while they recover. Well, some recover and can be released back into the wild, but we have four Magpies and two Galahs who became residents here when their wings did not mend. My problem is, I usually find injured birds I'm not familiar with on weekends and Public Holidays when no-one is around to contact.

debbie
debbie's picture

Isn't that always the way? It's almost like holiday season is dangerous also for the birds!

Debbie Bray

deva
deva's picture

hi Jenni,
so late with this reply as I've only recently joined up.
There is always a big risk that birds will die suddenly from delayed shock.. Still awful I know, but it is not necessarily something you have done or not done for them. Always worth trying though.
cheers
deva

Tassie

Gidday Jennikay, I just have to ask, your local "Birdcare" group does not care for Birds anymore ? Is there something I am missing here?
Did you ask them why they are called "Birdcare"
Cheers.

fantail
fantail's picture

You're birds had been hurt, hence the blood, injuries cannot always be seen ie- puncture wounds from cats. This can be serious for birds. Can lead to nasty infections, birds need to be treated as soon as possible. I expect their little bodies couldn't fight it and as mentioned above - shock...makes for an impossible task on your own. I believe you were already fighting a losing battle. A shame you were unable to find anyone to help.

FT

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