Canon EF 2x Extender - Bad reputation

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BajanAlan
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Canon EF 2x Extender - Bad reputation

Only heard bad things about this.

In the past I have used it with zoom lenses and been unhappy.

Tried it with the EF300 F/2.8 and this is the result.

dwatsonbb
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I would be happy with those results! Never seen these befor, could you ID please?

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

BajanAlan
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Hi Dale

Wandering Whistling Duck

Striated Heron (Butorides striata)

Rainbow Bee-eater (Merops ornatus)

Blue-faced Honeyeater (Entomyzon cyanotis)  Juvinelle will turn blue as it matures

Regards Alan

Backgrounds are very dark

pacman
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BajanAlan

#2 bird is not Striated Heron - wrong colour bill, I believe that it is a mature Pied Heron though I am not sure about the rufous shade

what camera body are you using? and did you use a tri or mono pod?

what were the weather conditions on the day?

Peter

BajanAlan
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Hi Peter

See this post

http://www.birdsinbackyards.net/forum/Bitten-0

 EOS 5D II, Clowdy morning around 8. Hand held but sitting or leaning. Regards Alan
pacman
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Alan

I see that I did not comment on the earlier post, the 3 birds are all Pied Herons,

note particularly the bill colour and the stance

Striated herons are noted for their skulking behaviour not standing upright with neck extended as the pic; and grey bill, yellowish below, they are also a dumpy bird 

I will attach a couple of pics, from the many in my library, ie I am very confident of this ID

I have the Canon 1.4x II extender and the Sigma 2x extender

The pics are not as sharp as you would expect, I get the impression of moisture in the air, was it a particularly humid day?

I would set up a target object at about 25 metres and then take a few pics with the extender and then few without the extender

Peter

Teresa Skerratt
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My husband bought one of these to go with his super canon camera and lens and he has been vey unhappy with the dergredation of the image, and is in contact wth the place of purchase, who requested imagages with and without the extender, the quality of images we were getting without the the extender far out way those with out, so we are waiting to hear back....

cheers 

Teresa Skerratt

Gardens for Birds Bees and Butterflies

BajanAlan
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Hi Teresa

What Lense did he use it with?

Is it a Mark III extender?

Regards Alan

Teresa Skerratt
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Hi Aaln, 

yes it was a Mark III and geoff uses a Canon EOS 5D MK  II camera and his lens is a EF 70-200mm f/2.8LIS2 USM lens...so we are not talking poor eqipement here !!! thats why we were so disappointed sad

Teresa Skerratt

Gardens for Birds Bees and Butterflies

BajanAlan
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Hi Teresa

Camera does not matter much.

Adaptors are for primes, they dont work very well with zooms.

Let us know what happens please

Regards Alan

BajanAlan
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Canon 2X teleconverter with 60D and 70-200mm test 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZpgXkEXYlU

 
pacman
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Alan

an interesting test

I note however that he connects the extender to the body and then to the lens, I believe that I have read to attach to the lens and then to the body and therefore follow this process

any comments?

Peter

BajanAlan
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Just checked instructions and u r right.

Also says extender may result in incorrect autofocus,

use AF microadjustment function.

I saw a Canon video that explained how to test for this.

pacman
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BajanAlan wrote:

use AF microadjustment function.

does that mean that I have to read a manual?

Peter

BajanAlan
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BajanAlan
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Re:he connects the extender to the body and then to the

While I was out this morning I needed to change extenders and tried both ways.

I think it is just physically a lot easier to do it the recomended way.

BajanAlan
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.

di.anneslegacy
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Hi

I have a canon 7D which is supposed to be wizz bang in low light.  I have not had very good results in low light, can anyone "shed any light on the subject".  I have also been playing around trying to get sulphur crested cockies, with definition in their wings, feathers etc.  I have found that when the sun is out I lower the ISO right down and also the exposure right down.  Bit tricky when they fly in and out of trees etc.  Have posted a couple of photos, I think I am getting there.  I guess I raise the bar a bit high as I always try and capture birds in flight.  Any more tips.

Diane Canberra

BajanAlan
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Photos look good to me.

Why dont you try seting the camera to AV,  put ISO on A and use AEB-+2

Headsie
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Hi Diane

I use the 7D with a 400mm lens and when shooting birds in flight I generally shoot with the ISO at around 400 up to 800. These cameras are good enough to shoot at these settings and it will increase your shutter speed giving more detail. Sometimes the light is so bright there is nothing you can do due to the inability of the camera to handle the dynamic range of the shot.

I rarely set my ISO lower than 400 and go for the higher shutter speeds when shooting birds this not only gives more detail but seems to isolate the bird better.

Below is a Tern I shot last week in full sun F5.6 ISO 400 Shutter speed 1/2500.

BajanAlan
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Grat capture

dna1972
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The Canon EF 2x teleconverter is best used with L lenses. In fact, I am pretty sure it will ONLY fit L lenses. However, the only zoom I'd ever consider using it with is the 70-200/2.8L zoom. Eg. forget the 100-400L zoom with a Canon 2x. The 100-400mm lens is not really the best in optical performance to begin with (when compared to 400mm prime).

The Canon EF 2x converter is quite good when used with a prime L super telephoto (or the 300/2.8L IS, which is not a super tele as such). I occasionally use it with my 500/4L IS lens under certain conditions. There are a few basic rules I employ though, and that also applies to my bird photography in general, I'll list them below in no particular order. Remembering, that I aim to get the BEST image quality not just a record shot, happy snaop or something I shoot from 200m away and crop the image to 1% of the original size. I don't waste my time with that, unless I see something I want to identify later, then I delete the image anyway.

1) The Canon EF 2x converter is a good piece of glass, but it loses two stops of light.

2) The Canon EF 2x is going to degrade the image quality. No image will be AS SHARP, AS GOOD, as shot with a Canon EF 1.4x or a bare lens. Period. People seem to think that adding a 2x changes nothing.

3) Shoot in the best quality light, not when it is really low, or poor light. (this I will bend for the bare 500/4L IS or the 500/4L IS with the EF 1.4x converter. I tend NOT to use the 2x in poor light. It just does not really give the best results. Although, IF, only IF, the subject is close enough, I may get away with it. But in general, I will not use the 2x in poor light. It's a waste of time. (except at night with flash being the only source of light, it is fine then)

4) Get as close to the subject as possible. I often use a 2x not even 6-7 meters from the subject. It works, and makes GOOD images. Like I said in point 2, NO image will be AS GOOD, AS SHARP, AS CLEAR as with the bare lens or the Canon EF 1.4x converter. People need to accept and understand this fact. It is still capable of creating excellent images! You MUST be close.

5) Use it often, know your limitations and understand the above points and it is possible to make good, sometimes excellent, images with the Canon EF 2x.

Dianne

You never mentioned any settings you use to try and capture those cockatoo pictures. The second image looks like strong shadows/highlights adjustment was used due to underexposure. Do you understand about the histogram, exposure or shooting in full manual mode in general?

The 7D is a fine enough camera and a lot of the bad results come down to the user not having a solid understanding of some basic photographing principles. People need to remember that having a good camera does not produce excellent images without actually knowing how to use it. The guys have given some good advice about flight shooting. It is not something I'd recommend if you have no experience with bird photography, or digital photography in general. People often tend to blame their gear first. :)

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