Fantails and their Micro-Mullets

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Annie W
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Fantails and their Micro-Mullets

I've been noticing for a while now, that Grey Fantails seem to have two wayward, hair thin and whisker-like feathers that protude from their nape.  Sometimes there can appear to be three or four depending on the angle, but looking through all my Fantail shots, it seems to be generally two.

Not a world changing observation, but curious to see if this was a shared trait with some of their cousins, I had a quick chat with Mr Google and it seems that Willie Wagtails and Rufous Fantails share the same little trait.

No idea if there is a purpose for these two little party feathers in the back - feel free to share if you know the answer - but I thought it was interesting anyway.  Bet someone out there can't help but have a look through their own shots now laugh

pacman
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what an astute observation!!

Peter

shoop
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Ok you got me ...I had to look..... and you are so right !!!!!!  

That really is some outstanding observation there AnnieJ.

I was wondering if we could add our own photos to your thread ?

Or maybe you could start a new challenge !wink

Kerry - Perth, Western Australia.

Annie W
Annie W's picture

Haha, gotcha shoop!! laugh  Of course - but thankyou so much for asking - I would LOVE to see some of your W.A. Fantails and their cousins sporting their best micro mullets!  What a fabulous idea about making it a challenge, didn't think of that.  If there's enough interest along the way, I'll swing this thread into challenges.  In the meantime, anyone else wants to post here too, go for it!

NW Tasmania

shoop
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Here is a photo of a Willie wagtail I took just the other day out at Bibra Lake ( my favoutire spot) and as you can see it too has a micro mullet.

Kerry - Perth, Western Australia.

Woko
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Fine facial feathers (as in the Tawny Frogmouth) are often for detecting insects. Fine protruding nape feathers are for....hmmm....detecting insects when reversing???

Annie W
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I like that theory Woko laugh.  I wonder if when in reverse, they make that typical reversing vehicle noise, but more of a "cheep cheep cheep".  Yeah o.k., that was terrible, I'll apologise for that corny joke now laugh.

NW Tasmania

shoop
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Corny AnnieJ ?,, I thought it was sweet ....hehehehehe!!!!!!!!!!!

Kerry - Perth, Western Australia.

timrp
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Well fantails and Willie Wagtails never sit still for too long, they spin around on the spot lots, maybe they spin around to look for the insects they they detected with their 'Micro Mullets'. Or to detect more insects with it.

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