Flock of Yellow-tailed Cockatoos

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Platypus
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Flock of Yellow-tailed Cockatoos

Living in Hunter Valley Wine Country for over 15 years now we have the pleasure of the occasional visit of a group of 3-4 Yellow-tailed Cockatoos. This morning at 9.30AM we were surprised to see a flock of 25-30 fly over our property, heading south.

I would love to know what the reason was for this unusual occurrence?!

Araminta
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Hi Platypus, I don't have the answer to your question, sorrycrying

Unusual? These days , yes?  Where I live , the farmers tell me that only 20 years (or so) ago, when they plowed their fields, hundreds circled their traktors. Shows you how quickly bird's lives can change. These days , although Yellow-tailes come to my property regularly, I hardly ever see more than 6.

We are destroying nature pretty fastangry

M-L

Annie W
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Hi Platypus

We witnessed a very similar and unusual occurance to us, a few weeks ago while at a Forest Reserve near Wynyard, Tasmania - the reserve is a mix of natural bush and pine plantation and is less than 15km from the coast.

We could hear an enormous racket way off into the bush, unmistakably the sound of Yellow-tailed BC's congregating to feed.  It must have been at least an hour later, when we started to see the most amazing sight above us.  Small family groups of 2-10 cockatoos began to fly overhead, quite spread out, all heading towards the noisy part of bush.  We'd never see so many before and in total, over about 30 minutes or so, counted in excess of 200 birds.  Absolutely amazing sight, and the sound was incredible!  When we left the reserve, there were two or three groups near the entranceway, drinking from muddy puddles and feasting on green pine cones.

I went searching to find out if YtBC's are also one of Tasmania's many birds that migrate over Bass Strait to the mainland before winter.  didn't find the answer to that yet, but while looking I did learn that, Australia wide, families of Cockatoos will often join up together as a larger flock once breeding season is over, and also read that there was evidence to suggest that they do move towards the coast in winter, often in large flocks, moving from elevated areas to lower lying areas.

If that's the case, you may be in for a treat and see some more larger than normal groups! smiley

NW Tasmania

Platypus
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Thanks anyway Araminta,

Would have loved to witness that! Same here in the Hunter with the Straw-necked Ibis. If we're lucky,  we can observe 30-40 foraging on the ground together or flying overhead in formation, where in the early days it was more like 2000 individuals at the time.

Yes, we are destroying nature pretty fast and sadly and most worrying, the Government is playing a BIG part in it!

platypus

timrp
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While I was in Victoria once I saw thousands of Straw Necked Ibis it was by far the most birds I have seen at once

Platypus
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Thank you Annie for sharing your absolute amazing experience with us!

I can only imagine that sound in the quiet of the reserve.
 

The Yellow-tail BC is one of my favourite birds. We can't help run outside every time we hear the 'baby cry' of these majestic visitors.

platypus

Annie W
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We went back to the same Reserve yesterday in the late afternoon, and they were still there!  You could hear the Yellow-tails in their hundrends deep into and over, a large area of plantation pine.  Couldn't help but remember your love of them Platypus - although I wonder if my daughter thought her mum had finally lost her marbles muttering about how (a) Platypus would like to see and hear it all too. laugh 

Hope you don't mind me adding these photo's to your thread?  They were taken just before dusk, so I didn't quite get exposures right and I don't have a wide angle lens unfortunately to have given the experience true credit, but above the group drinking on the ground, were perhaps another 20 or 30 perched amongst the young pines behind them.  We watched them for about five minutes, then all of a sudden they took off as group after group of more YtBC's flew over us, out of the West side of the pines, all headed towards the Eastern end.  Many many more than last time, and flying together in larger flocks this time.  About 6 or 7 waves of them in groups of about 40 or more.  Noise and sight was, once again, wonderful.

NW Tasmania

Woko
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Great to see a relative abundance of this species, Annie.

Annie W
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A heartwarming sight for sure Woko!

NW Tasmania

Platypus
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:) hehe, you made me laugh there, Annie!

What an experience - thank you for sharing again. The pictures are worth a thousand words!

platypus

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