Beak and Feather

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tapd0g
tapd0g's picture
Beak and Feather

Has anyone had any experience with rosellas infected with beak and feather disease? About two months or so a female rosella and her chick began coming to feed at my bird-feeder. Her condition didn't look optimal at first but over the last week she has deteriorated. Her mate has begun to come with her in the last week and he also appears to have poor feather condition. I am going to attempt to post images and as a back-up a link to my photostream on flickr for id. If it is beak and feather, what do I do? Must I stop all feeding and remove the bird-bath?

If all else fails go to:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/tapd0g/3256127237/

and follow the photostream :)

DenisWilson
DenisWilson's picture

Hi tapd0g

The feathers are certainly bad, but I do not see any sign of the beak getting extended, as it does in White Cockies with that disease.
Could it be just a seasonal thing - eg, juvenile birds, or a moulting stage, or even heat stress?
Good hygiene re bird baths and feeders is always a safe strategy.
If they do have beak and feather disease, I am not sure you can do anything about it. But you certainly do not want to aid in spreading it.
Others may have experience with it. WIRES (or similar organisation in your State) is always a useful contact.
Best of luck.
Denis

magpie
magpie's picture

It doesnt look like PBFD as the feathers haven't actually fallen out by the look of it, looks raelly like a moulting thing but could be something parasitic.
Bird baths and feeders spread disease very quickly. Any other bird that comes to that feeder can potentially pick up whatever is affecting these rosellas.

Got any avian vets where you are? Take the photo to them as they will have a good idea what it is.

tapd0g
tapd0g's picture

Thanks for the very speedy reply. I had originally thought the female was just another juvenile because of her pale colour until I watched her crop-feed the crying youngster accompanying her.

It has been very hot here recently over an extended time, so heat stress could well be an issue. I also wondered about the possibility of mite contamination of nesting material as both male and female seem to be affected.

I will watchfully wait and contact WIRES if they do seem to be getting worse and continue with good hygiene practice for the feeders and the bird-bath.

Thanks again :)

tapd0g
tapd0g's picture

Got any avian vets where you are? Take the photo to them as they will have a good idea what it is.

I'm not sure if we have any avian vets locally but I will check. It does worry me that anything parasitic could be passed on to other birds.

SharonS
SharonS's picture

Hi all,
another question on beak and feather - we have a large flock of Sulphar Crested Cockatoos that visit daily, I have noticed 1 bird in particular with bad beak and feather disease, my question is - can the bush turkey's catch it too? We had a turkey visit today with very elongated top and bottom beak sections and very thin ratty tail feathers. The cockatoos and turkeys do come in close contact with each other on our neighbours roof and in our back section of yard. What other birds can catch it?
Thanks for any help
Sharon.

DenisWilson
DenisWilson's picture

Hi Sharon
It is called "Psittacine Beak and Feather Disease" which means it is a Parrot disease.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psittacine_beak_and_feather_disease
That report does not mention it spreading to other genera of birds.
Brush Turkeys are a very long way from Parrots on the family tree of birds.
But other birds, like Chooks, do get other diseases.
Cheers
Denis

SharonS
SharonS's picture

Thanks Denis, I will have to do some research on the types of diseases Bush Turkeys can get, or this one may just have a malformed beak and not be able to look after it's feathers properly.
Sharon

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