Cuckoo-ish bird

8 posts / 0 new
Last post
booshkie
booshkie's picture
Cuckoo-ish bird

I'm hoping someone here can confirm my tentative ID on this bird.

I was first alerted by a loud single note that reminded me of a raptor cry. When I found the source I was astonished that so much volume could come from a relatively small bird. It was high in the treetops (dry schlerophyll forest, Central Tablelands, NSW).

At the time I guessed fan-tailed cuckoo which seemed to fit the description in my mum's bird book but looking at Simpson and Day now I'm not so sure.

Any theories?

ed
ed's picture

A big call from those photos, could be a fan tail, could also be a brush.
Ed

Ed Townsville NQ

booshkie
booshkie's picture

Well, I did say it was a tentative ID.

I wouldn't have been surprised if someone came back and said it wasn't a cuckoo at all.

My field guide says nothing about the fanning out of the tail. And a quick google didn't turn up any helpful images of fanned-out tails for comparison.

---booshkie---

booshkie
booshkie's picture

Thanks Denis, very helpful indeed.

---booshkie---

Honeyman
Honeyman's picture

I was looking to identify a bird in my backyard.
It is very similar to this, and I have a much better photo.
What really puzzled me though was that it is eating berries. I thought the cuckoo family were insectivores mainly.
Can't see what to do to show you the photo.

Honeyman
Honeyman's picture

Here, put this in your browser bar, and you will see a picture of the cuckoo.
http://www.webgooroo.com.au/images/coucal-sm.jpg

ed
ed's picture

Hi Honeyman (that seems wrong!!)

That's a Koel, light form, young female I'd say.

Ed Townsville NQ

Honeyman
Honeyman's picture

Thanks for that Ed, now I Googled Koel and I understand.
I live in Fitzgibbon, Brisbane, next to a section of Cabbagetree Creek which has not yet been denuded by the city council of shelter for wildlife.
Another part of the creek where I was walking one recent morning stunk of weedkiller, all vegetation dead. No wildlife there.
I used to be a commercial beekeeper, hence the "Honeyman".

 and @UrbanBirdsOz  @birdsinbackyards
                 Subscribe to me on YouTube