A common Plover ?

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kell
kell's picture
A common Plover ?

I always believed the parents carried the chicks under the wings.
And I thought they were the beaks sticking out near the chest.
Then I found a dead one on the road and realised they were barbs or hooks.
Which just shows to go, I / we are never to old to learn.

kell
kell's picture

A close up of its mate.
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These two have lived in my front Horse paddock for many years now.
They love it when I slash the grass with the ride on.
They will walk within a meter of me looking for food. ( insects ? )

booshkie
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Great shots of an intriguing bird.

I love the sound of plovers too.

---booshkie---

kell
kell's picture

Hi booshkie,
Yes I concur with you.
I also like their way of talking.
I have never been dive bombed by these lovely Birds.
But if strangers go near their nest they get attacked immediately.
They must know my intentions.

Gelmir
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Hi Kell,

Great close up of the head.

kell
kell's picture

Thank you Gelmir.
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After posting these Pic’s on an Umerican Bird site.

I now know exactly what this common Plover is called.
It’s a Masked Lapwing (Vanellus miles)
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Thanks every on for your help.

Cheers kell

bushanwater
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Another name is, wait for it, Spur Winged plover. I have been attacked many times but never actually hit. I don't know of anyone who has either. I used to stop spraying chemicals on a farm once and cover a plover nest with an icecram container (because I couldn't avoid spraying) and then uncover when I was past. The last time I saw them I saw cracked egg with a beak showing through. The next day they were all gone.

See Yez
Trev

kell
kell's picture

Hi bushanwater,

I have found a similar thing with the eggs.
The first day I see one broken egg the next day they are all gone.
Probably a survival thing.
But I will see them all ( 3 or 4 chicks ) running around but keeping very close to long grass for at least one week.
But not since I have been taking Bird Pics.

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