Lone Kookaburra

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cdturnbull
cdturnbull's picture
Lone Kookaburra

Hi Im Colin,  Recentley a Kookaburra has decided to befriend me !.Over approx 6 years I have heard two in the area (Vermont) but seen them only 2 or 3 times. About one weak ago 1 Kookaburra turned up outside my door (I live in a bungalo). The Magpies and Wattle Birds anoy it for a while but it does not anoy them.I do not know if it is an abandond young or if it was a part of a pair and has lost its partener. You  will not believe this !?. About 1 minut ago I saw Him/Her outside, I got a container of mince out the fridge that i keep for the magies (only feed marble size pieces every 2-3 days), I made two small balls for it and Kook flew into the bungalo and took them off the bench,WOW.   I do not know if it is male ,female,young ,old, abbandond or an escaped pet. Once before I approched it with two marbels of mince and it took then from my hand. I have two good photos of Kook on my phone but do not know how to get them on to the computer but can send by SMS .Can any one help ,      0428 395 716  Thanks Colin.

Woko
Woko's picture

Hi Colin.

Whatever might be the case, this Kookaburra needs to be treated as a wild bird. To do otherwise with native birds is to treat them as playthings & therefore with disrespect. Perhaps even worse, it prevents the Kookaburra from performing its role in the environment. For example, artificially feeding it with meat balls reduces its capacity as a snake population controller. In turn, this treats the environment & its ecological systems with disrespect. While we get a kick out of getting up close & personal with birds we can get an even bigger buzz out of watching them go about their business in the natural environment - once we learn to highly appreciate it.

Your curiosity about the behavior of the Kookaburra which has entered your life is to be admired. The most likely explanation for the behavior which has piqued your interest is that it has been artificially fed be someone else in your neighborhood. You would do well by this bird to treat it as a wildling &, if you can track her/him down, encourage your neighbor to do likewise.

cdturnbull
cdturnbull's picture

Thank you for your response ,though it does seem a tad aggressive, hoping that was not your intent. I am aware it is not ideal to ocasionaly feed native wildlife , however it does not answer my primary questions. Are you sudgesting that I completley ignore the bird given it could be ?? completley dependant, thats why I was asking the questions . If the Kookaburra needs help I will find the appropriat carers coz I actuly do care .I stated I had two good photos ,I do not know anything about Kookaburras , what I do know is that I have ,maggies , wattle birds , buttcher birds , shrubrens , carawongs ( both pied & grey ) ,turtle doevs , & thornbills visiting my back yard verry verry regularley amongst others and no they are not all fed, I simpuly put in shrubs, trees, rockeries, ponds, birdbaths & nesting boxes for birds and possums (baffeld of corse for mynas) sorry I forgot the frogmouths which nest and roost also, but I dont know bucklies about Kookaburras.  I have photos here that I can send as stated . The bird looks old to me but yet it seems to have down  on its chest and an unusual texture to its beek. I have tried sorsing the book (Kookaburra King Of The Bush, CSIRO publication 2004 By Sarah Legge)  But can not find it any where, Thats why I came here for help, can you with constructive advice as all the other wildlife that I share the back yard with seem as fit as a fiddle. Looking forward to yuur responce Woko, Regards Colin.

Woko
Woko's picture

Sounds like you're establishing some nice habitat there, Colin. I particularly like your discouragement of Indian Mynahs which aggressively compete with native species & are likely to dominate. Are you using indigenous species as part of your habitat restoration?

By the way, I presume you're aware that Spotted Turtle Doves are not native to Australia. Personally, I discourage them as I'm trying to encourage the native Peaceful Doves & Bronzewings. 

I'd be reluctant to continue artificially feeding the Kookaburra & believe you're on the right track in establishing natural habitat in your garden. You could try gradually reducing the artificial feeding of the Kookaburra but it seems to me this would prolong the bird's return to its natural role as part of an ecological system. I hope that answers your question. 

And thanks for the feedback about being a tad aggressive. I had hoped it would be seen as to the point but I can see that some would see it as being on the aggressive side. Perhaps my passion for the environment gets the better of me at times. But then there is so much aggression against the environment it's a wonder I'm not a raving maniac in defense of it at other times! 

pacman
pacman's picture

hello Colin - I suggest that you look for your local Wildlife carers or tell us the city/town/suburb wher eyou live and someone may be able to direct you

Peter

HelloBirdy
HelloBirdy's picture

They won't and shouldn't take it just because it is tame. I presume someone has been overfeeding it, but that does not mean it is totally dependant on people for food. I say just leave it, and it should manage fine on its own and is best for the bird

Ryu
Canberra
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