Nothing Wrong with a Grey Currawong

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Woko
Woko's picture
Nothing Wrong with a Grey Currawong

In my experience of observing birds in the Mt Lofty Ranges the Grey Currawong is most likely seen in the wetter parts of the Ranges. We live on the drier south eastern side of the Ranges & seldom see a Grey Currawong so it was with delight late this afternoon when I heard the echoing call of one.

Casual observation suggests that "our" biodiversity has taken a significant leap upwards in the last twelve months or so with increasing numbers of butterfly species, lizards & several new bird species being seen &/or heard. There have also been the reappearance of seldom seen species such as the above Grey Currawong & the Red-bellied Black Snake as well as more than usual observations of species such as the Boobook Owl. A significantly wetter than average year plus the ongoing maturity of our bush revegetation & regeneration are probably contributing factors.

GregL
GregL's picture

Great to hear thingsare improving out your way Woko. The work of individual landowners is one of the good trends in conservation, given the withdrawal from government involvement in conservation efforts. One thing I have noticed here is when hobby farmers take over from actual farmers there is much less pressure on the ecosystem, less clearing, cropping and grazing which allows natural regeneration even without the efforts of landowners.

Sadly, I find that as I get more birds living on my property I get less butterflies.

Woko
Woko's picture

Hey, Greg. Is there a connection between increased bird numbers & decreased butterfly numbers at your place? Or is there some other explanation for the decrease in butterfly numbers? 

At my place I think the exponential spread of native grasses has enabled butterfly numbers to increase markedly as a number of species' eggs are laid on native grasses. But I notice a lot of Superb Fairywrens & Yellow-rumpled Thornbills feeding among the native grasses. They may well be feeding on the eggs. 

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