Sigma 150-600

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rawshorty
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Sigma 150-600
saturnv78
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Very interesting, huge lens, 2.8kg! I have the Tamron 150-600, will be interesting to see how the Sigma compares..

Lachlan
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Whooo! Looking forward to Photokina. Looks like there should be some good stuff this year. 

timrob
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I've just taken the plunge and bought this lens. Yes it's a monster in size and weight so there will be some issues I'm sure with some of the extended walks that I do. Only taken about 100 shots so my non-technical review is below:

- heavy   ....  but I knew that before I bought it.  You really need either a harness or a tripod or both for this monster

- significant investment at $2000 for the sport model which I bought

- focusses really fast

- almost silent auto-focus

- supposedly dust and moisture proof but I'm not game to try either

- auto-focus range can be set to suit your shooting conditions

- permanently attached tripod collar.  May not suit some but I have it in "portrait mode' so it does not interfere with what I'm doing in landscape and I use it as a support in portrait.

- manual overide of auto-focus.  Yes they have achieved this and you don't damage the lens doing it.

- apparently will auto-focus with the new matching sigma 1.4 teleup to f8.  I haven't tried this as I dont own one, but that would take max to 840mm

I've posted the pics below elsewhere in the forums but here they are again.  Am I happy?  Yes it is a significant step up from the Sigma150-500.  Is it worth the money?  Well it's still significantly cheaper than a 500mm or 600mm Canon prime, and at this stage they are in my fantasy land, but I am really happy. 

pacman
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have you tried a monopod and walk with the lens on your shoulder, that is my style with the Canon 400 DO

Peter

timrob
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Yes Peter I have, but mostly I rely on a harness that transfers the weight from my neck to my shoulders. This is the one that I use but there are probably others:  http://optechusa.com/dual-harness.html   This allows me to have my binos on the left and my camera on the right (I'm right handed) and when walking I tend to cradle the camera and lens rather than carrying in my hand or supporting it with the harness.

 The camera/lens combo is around 5.5Kg and I do not (usually) stay in one spot, so managing it (them) on a 4 - 5km walk will be interesting.  The monopod may well prove to be my best friend in these situations.

Thanks for the advice.

Tim

pacman
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I wouldn't use that harness with a heavy lens as the weight will all be on the body-lens coupling

Peter

rawshorty
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pacman wrote:

I wouldn't use that harness with a heavy lens as the weight will all be on the body-lens coupling

I agree strongly with this comment.

You should always have the strap attached to the tripod mount on the lens.

Shorty......Canon gear

Canberra

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rawshorty/ 

timrob
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Evenin' Peter,

 The harness attaches to the camera body where the strap would normally be. I use two adapters - one on each side of the camera body - to clip on to the harness. Clearly with 5kg plus I will not let the lens/body hang so the stress on the lens/body joint is not as you describe.   Frankly a 5kg weight hanging off a harness is no better that 5kg hanging off your neck (other than it's off you neck and on your shoulder) . I mostly cradle the body and lens while I'm walking, and the harness really just takes the weight of my binos.  When having the camera ready for a quick shot I hold the camera by it's grip - again no extra demands on the joint.  Trust me, this a better alternative to two neck straps.  And yes no matter how you do it, carrying 5kg plus is tiring so generally I'll take at least a monopod and if stationary a tripod, and I take a backpack that will fit the combo when I tire.

Tim

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