Wader Challenge

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ihewman
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Wader Challenge

I have devised a little challange which will test your wader ID skills. Let's start by posting a photo of a flock of waders (any panorama of a flock or group photo will suffice). The person who identifies all species in the photo correctly posts another photo of a wader flock, and so on... Please allow everyone to have a go at IDing by not identifying every photo.

This thread shall be open for as long until it gets exhausted.

This photo contains 6 species. The photo is small as you often see waders far away and distorted by shimmering heat (not my photo).

shoop
shoop's picture

Not good at all with waders so big guesses here:

1.Grey Plover 

2. Sanderling

3. Red necked Stint

4. Great Knot

5. Common Sandpiper

6. Ruddy Turnstone. (100%)

Kerry - Perth, Western Australia.

sue818
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Difficult challenge. My guess:

Double-banded plover

Ruddy Turnstone

Red Knot

Sanderling

Red necked Stint

Common sandpiper or Tattler... those yellow legs are the problem

Sue

ihewman
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Red Knot, Great Knot and Ruddy Turnstone are correct... Check and compare sizes.

Brandon (aka ihewman)

ihewman
ihewman's picture

I'll give you a hint, greater...; ... sandpiper; grey-......

Brandon (aka ihewman)

sue818
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Hi Brandon, great challenge and hope that someone new will rise to meet it soon. Waders seem especially difficult. Sue

sue818
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Hi Brandon, as no one seems to be following up and I would like the answer, could I suggest the following?

Red Knot, Great Knot and Ruddy Turnstone along with Greater Sand plover; Terek Sandpiper; Grey-.tailed Tattler

Not sure of last as I suggested a Tattler earlier although I did not stipulate Grey-tailed

A larger picture would have helped me as I always zoom in with my pictures anyway for ID

Sue

ihewman
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I'll give it to you... all are correct, however the sandpipers are actually Curlew Sandpipers. The in flight plover looks like a Double-banded but "second" band seems to be the shadow of its wings. Also, size comparisons with the other birds suggests it can't be a DB Plover, rather a Greater SP. The tattler is not a Common Sandpiper as the underwing pattern is not conspicuously marked like that of a Common Sandpiper.

Brandon (aka ihewman)

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