Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos

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Rick N
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Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos

Working on a construction site at Urrbrae only about10kms from the Adelaide city centre and was pleased to see a small flock of Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos fly over.

Great that they are so close to the city.

Woko
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Sometimes seen in Adelaide's eastern suburbs, Rick, so not altogether unusual at Urrbrae. I once saw a flock of about 70 at Belair National Park & about 100 midst pine trees on South Road near Reynella. 20 at my place yesterday but that's 50 km from the CBD.

Rick N
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Thanks Woko, was unaware they were in the burbs. Cheers

Woko
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26 at my place today. I have an ancient, dead River Red Gum Eucalyptus camaldulensis with deep hollows so I'm hoping they'll nest there some season. However, they'll need to get a wriggle on as the tree is gradually collapsing under the strain of age. A great example of a tree returning nutrients to the soil.

Woko
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56 today, the most I've seen at our place on the s.e. slopes of the Mt Lofty Ranges. Numbers are increasing each year. But no sign of them using hollows in the dead River Red Gum. In fact, they often fly right over the top of it to parts unknown.

Araminta
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Lucky you Woko !

The larges flocks "invading" my trees are about 6-8.

Have also seen them in town. (If you can call Gembrook a town?)

M-L

zosterops
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i believe they are increasing in some areas, feeding on radiata and other introduced conifer cones which they have adapted to. 

in fact in e melbourne burbs i usually only see them in pines. 

mind you, they could merely be recovering from a decline caused by widespread removal of their original food trees. 

Woko
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They certainly use the Monterey Pines Pinus radiata at my place even tho' I've removed half of them (the pines, that is). And they also feed in the Banksias I grew. Now I notice them more frequently in the female Drooping She-oaks Allocasuarina verticillata. Oh for a simultaneous invasion of Glossy Black Cockatoos from Kangaroo Island.

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