kookaburra feeding its young at my window

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kyrani99
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kookaburra feeding its young at my window

This is a video of a kookaburra, which calls her young and feeds it chicken at my window.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfpENhc73BI

Woko
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Hi Kyrani. Looks like you have some tasty bugs around your window. Good for you for preserving the biodiversity at your house. And it's nice to be able to see Kookaburras up close & personal at the same time. 

kyrani99
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Hi Woko, I do have incredible diversity in my yard and I do everything I can to make sure they are happy. I livea at the end of a cul-de-sac that ends up in a hill where there is rainforest. Most of my house and yard is inside the rain forest. I see bush turkeys everyday, also bush fowl, kookaburras, butcher birds, friar birds, robins, wagtails and sunbirds. The sunbirds had nested on a string that was handing from my bedroom ceiling. It was part of an old mosquitoe net canopy I had over my bed.. I do feed some of them so I do get to see them up close and personal.

Recently I saw a frog-mouth on a branch near my balcony but I couldn't get a good picture of him. He may have been after some small animals on the ground that come at night, including mice.

I also have frequent visitors of goannas, giant and smaller lizards and snakes. I have pythons coming into my house frequently

Some I have seen enough times, so I have named them. They come in after mice. I must admit I have fed the mice to stop them going into my stuff but they quickly multiplied. So I was glad to see the snakes. They do a good job of keeping the numbers down low.

Woko
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Wow! What an environment! I admire you're acceptance of the various animals that inhabit your neck of the rainforest. 

Ms Woko & I have restored as best we can what we think was the original vegetation of our area on the south eastern slopes of the Mt Lofty Ranges in SA. Lots of birds now call our place home - or they probably would if they had human brains. Lots of others are migratory & still others use our place as a refuge from drought & other nasties or a corridor to get from A to B. All up we've recorded 137 species. A couple of years ago we had lots of Australian bush rats take up residence & for some years we've had resident Euros. Western Grey Kangaroos have been her for years - except when local farmers go on a rifle rampage. 

Because of their venom we haven't accepted Common Brown Snakes into our house yet but we're happy to see them & Red-belllied Black Snakes when we're out & about. Like your pythons, they keep the mouse numbers down. We decided long ago not to artificially feed the birds which visit us, preferring them to feed from the natural food we provide them via indigenous plantings. 

Nature is a total delight for us & we always welcome returning home from our occasional visits to Adelaide where artificiality, noise & overcrowding abound.

Do keep posting about the various bird species & other wildlife which you see. 

kyrani99
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It is nice to hear that you have restored the natural vegetation. I also appreciate the natural vegetation and when we built the house my late husband and I only had the barest minimum of tress cut down. I am glad I did that because now a lot of native birds come and eat from the fruits and nuts in the trees. So I can appreciate your efforts.

I am very impressed with your recording of 137 species of birds. Wow. I thought I had a lot of birds but it's nothing like that. The one very rare bird I have seen, though not recently is the goshawk.

The bush rats are part of living in the forest. I have seen red bellied blacks on my driveway but they are ground snakes and don't come inside. My house is high set pole home so only pythons come in from the trees. I think your right not to let any venomous snakes in.

I have wallabies and kangaroos too. I should have mentioned them. They have a reddish fur and some are a fair height, probably around 5 ft or taller.

I made a post here: http://www.birdsinbackyards.net/forum/What-bird-makes-nest

do you know what bird makes this nest? Thanks

Woko
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While we may have recorded 137 species that doesn't mean they're all resident here. They include one-offs like a flock of Cape Barren Geese which passed overhead during a very wet period in the early 1990s. Normally, Cape Barren Geese wouldn't be seen dead, so to speak, within about 40 km of our place. Still, we're extremely pleased with the diversity we have, including now rare species for the Mt Lofty Ranges like the Diamond Firetail which occasionally visit.

Ain't nature grand!

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