Dale's Big Year Challenge 2021

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dwatsonbb
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Dale's Big Year Challenge 2021

Well it has taken a while to get back into the challenge, Was undecided if I would join for a bit, now that the number of participants are growing. Anyway not too many trips so far this year, but I have enjoyed them so far. I certainly have no expectations for any particular number of birds this year, so we will have to wait and see

Here is my contribution year to date. A couple with extra photos, just because I can!

1 Grey Butcherbird - Waterworks Reserve, very close to Hobart, could hear several calling, took some time to locate - this one a young bird I think.

Grey Butcherbird (Cracticus torquatus ssp. cinereus) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

2. Striated Padalote - Waterworks again, not many good photos this day.

Striated Pardalote (Pardalotus striatus) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

3. Yellow Wattlebird (endemic)- Dru Point near Margate if you look hard, you can see the tip of the "wattle" on the right shoulder. This was a good day for the birds, a  few I was not expecting.

Yellow Wattlebird (Anthochaera paradoxa) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

4. Tasmanian Native-hen (endemic) - Dru Point, there is always plenty these around.

Tasmanian Native Hen by Dale Watson, on Flickr

5. Brown Thornbill - too late for breakfast, too early for lunch, so maybe brunch? Some more photos in a series over in Best Photos.

Brown Thornbill   (Acanthiza pusilla ssp diemenesis) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

6. Australian Magpie - Dru Point.

Australian Magpie (Gymnorhina tibicen ssp. hypoleuca) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

7. Common Bronzewing - Dru Point. Usually see the back end as they fly off, this one was failry close, but behind a cyclone wire fence (at least not a stick this time!).

Common Bronzewing (Phaps chalcoptera) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

8. Australian Wood Duck - Dru Point.

Australian Wood Duck (Chenonetta jubata) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

9. Laughing Kookaburra - Dru Point.

Laughing aburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

10. Galah - Dru Point. There is a 2nd, possibly a mate, behind the foliage RHS.

Galah (Elopus rosiecapilla) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

11. Masked Lapwing - Dru Point. A bird I see every day, but not often you can get this close.

Galah (Elopus rosiecapilla) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Masked Lapwing (Vanellus miles ssp. novaehollandiae) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

12. Dusky Woodswallow - Dru Point. Stretching the wings, looks like it is wearing a cape.

Dusky Woodswallow (Artamus cyanopterus) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

13. Superb Fairy-wren - Dru Point. The sun was sort of behind and to the right, so lighting not ideal, but I like the result.

Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

And then a stroll along the foreshore at Dru Point, a couple of unexpected birds.

14. Pacific Gull - Dru Point. Not often seen here.

Pacific Gull (Larus pacificus) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

15. White-faced Heron - Dru Point.

White-faced Heron (Egretta novaehollandiae) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

16. Australian Pied Oystercatcher - Dru Point. Sorry if there are too many photos, but they are one of my faves as far as colourful goes. This one was feeding, there were 4 in total.

Australian Pied Oystercatcher (Haematopus longirostris) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Australian Pied Oystercatcher by Dale Watson, on FlickrAustralian Pied Oystercatcher. (Haematopus longirostris) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

17. Silver Gull with young - Dru Point.

Silver Gull (Larus novaehollandiae) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

18. (Greater) Crested Tern, a real surprise, never seen them here before (6 of them) - Dru Point.

Greater Crested Tern (Thalasseus bergii) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

And now for another great loocation, Gould's Lagoon about 15 minutes north of Hobart.

19. Eastern Rosella (Tasmanian ssp.)

Eastern Rosella (Platycercus eximius Tas. ssp diemenensis) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

20. Silvereye - again the Tasmanian ssp. A very flighty bird, I find hard to get decent photos of, so I am happy with this one.

Silvereye (Zosterops lateralis) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

21. Purple Swamphen (aka Australasion Swamphen). Light was difficult - too bright if thats possible.

Purple Swamphen (Porphyrio porphyrio) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

22. Spotted Dove - another flighty little bird.

Spotted Dove (Spilopelia chinensis) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

23. Little Wattlebird - in the shadows.

Little Wattlebird (Anthochaera chrysoptera) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

24. Little Black Cormorant - and extra crop to show that beautiful eye colour.

Little Black Cormorant(Phalacrocorax sulcirostris) by Dale Watson, on FlickrLittle Black Cormorant by Dale Watson, on Flickr

25. Little Pied Cormarant - the cormorants sit in a particular tree, this day only 2 species (both Little) but often all 5 (found in Tasmania).

Little Pied Cormorant (Microcarbo melanoleucos) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

26. Pacific Black Duck - an unusal angle, but I liked it.

Pacific Black Duck (Anas superciliosa) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

27. Australasian Shoveler.

Australasian Shoveler (Spatula rhynchotis) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

28. Chestnut Teal - usually see Grey Teal as well, but not this day.

Chestnut Teal (Anas castanea) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

29. Eastern Great Egret - not a great shot, but I like the reflection.

Great Egret (Ardea alba) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

karentwemlow
karentwemlow's picture

Hey Dale, welcome!! What fanstastic photos you've taken, I especially love that little Dusky Woodswallow, so cute!!!

TommyGee
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Welcome to the Big Year Dale :) Great birds and photos to get the ball rolling. Your Pacific Black Duck is brilliant, sometimes it's the unusual angles that hit the right note.

AbbyGrace
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Nice set of photos Dale. Especially love the Brown Thornbill.

dannyka6
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Smashing set of photos to get started Dale, I'm really glad to decided on joining in!

Great quality shots but the ducks and oystercatchers in particular are really terrific! I am jealous of your endemics, I'm really hoping I can wangle a trip over at some stage this year to get some of your Tassie specialties :) 

dwatsonbb
dwatsonbb's picture

Thanks for all your kind comments. My birding time will be patchy this year, but I will see what I can do.

Extremely impressed by everyone's rapid fire start this year, some amazing photos of some amazing birds, thanks to all for sharing.

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

sue818
sue818's picture

A wonderful set of birds and photos, Dale... what a great start. The eye on that Tasmanian Native-hen is brilliant and I love the Dusky woodswallow. Some really nice shots and so happy to see you taking part. Number does not matter, it is all good fun.

dwatsonbb
dwatsonbb's picture

Thanks Sue, hope your all staying dry enough up north!

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

Alex Rogers
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Hi Dale, welcome back, I'm really glad you decided to participate again. I love seeing your Tassie birds - looking forward to seeing more :-) 

Devster
Devster's picture

Hey Dale. Great to have you on board again and fantastic set. Love seeing the endemics

Annie W
Annie W's picture

Some cracking shots there Dale, good to see how much you're out and about around Tas capturing these beauties!

West Coast Tasmania

dwatsonbb
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Thanks for comments, hoping to get some more photos soon.

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

dwatsonbb
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So this year I won't break any records with numbers of species, but I chance boring you with too many photos of the same species. 

A few more from the past month or so, some with multiple shots just because I can.

I have been doing work related study at home, and my office overlooks the backyard, where I have had quite a few visitors to our apples. We pick only a few for ourselves, family and neighbours, but always leave plenty for the birds. All the photos from my office are taken through a window.

I will put a complete "Backyard" list over in best photos in the next week or so (can maybe put more photos of each).

Honeyeaters and Robins for Sue, I know she has a soft spot for them.

30. Crescent Honeyeater - female 1st from the office (late arvo and in the house shadow), and the male was coming out of work at 7am on a wet gloomy day - so happy with the results.

New Holland Honeyeater (Phylidonyris novaehollandiae) (3) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Crescent Honeyeater (Phylidonis pyrrhopterus) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Crescent Honeyeater (Phylidonyris pyrrhopterus) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

31. New Holland Honeyeater. Another species from the office window. Several of these at the same time.

New Holland Honeyeater (Phylidonyris novaehollandiae) (3) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

New Holland Honeyeater (Phylidonyris novaehollandiae) (2) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

New Holland Honeyeater (Phylidonyris novaehollandiae) (4) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

32. Common Blackbird female and male - not my favourite, but I have now wasted 2 photos so I can bolster my number of species. Again from the office window.

Common Blackbird - female (Turdus merula) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Common Blackbird - male (Turdus merula) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

33. Long-billed Corella - usually found around Brown's River at Kingston Beach, south of Hobart. No Short-billed this day, they often appear to be in the same flock.

Long-billed Corella (Cacatua tenuirostris) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

34. Kelp Gull - like most, trying to practice birds in flight, so this one was slow moving into a head wind, easy target.

Kelp Gull (Larus dominicanus) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

35. Common Starling - Another "not my fave" and another "wasted photo", but they are quite pretty, not their fault they are here. Yet another common visitor to the apples.

Common Starling (Sturnus  vulgaris) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

36. Scarlet Robin - an ebc, but clearly identifiable - was a long way off, so extreme crop.

Scarlet Robin (Petroica boodang) by Dale Watson, on Flickrscarl

37. Dusky Robin (endemic), male top and female bottom. Again a fair way off, couldn't get much quality on the little lady.

Dusky Robin (Melanodryas vittata) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

38. Black-faced Cormorant - I think a young bird, face/cap is still a bit brownish.

Black faced Cormorant Phalacrocorax fuscescens by Dale Watson, on Flickr

39. Musk Lorikeet - fast moving always partially hidden, but very colouful.

Musk Lorikeet (Glossopsitta concinna) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

This one was preening.

Musk Lorikeet (Glossopsitta concinna) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

40. Australian Pelican, sorry for the overload, but I like them all (flight shots extra heavy crop).

Australian Pelican (Pelecanus conspicillatus) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Australian (PelicanPelecanus conspicillatus) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Australian Pelican (Pelecanus conspicillatus) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Australian Pelican (Pelecanus conspicillatus) (3) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

41. Forest Raven - usually see these chewing on roadkill, a very common bird, seen most days, but very flighty, so hard to get decent photos of. You can drive past at 100kph and they will move just enough no to get hit, but stop for a photo - gonsky!

Forest Raven (Corvus tasmanicus) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

42. Brown Quail - definite EBC, you have to trust me, I spooked 3 or 4 small flocks maybe 8-10, just managed to capture this one. Not a great subject to practice BIF shots! If anyone disagrees on ID happy to remove. Confident only 2-3 metres away with a good view, not much else of that size and body shape to pick from.

Brown Quail (Synoicus ypsilophorus) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

43. Sooty Oystercatcher - plenty of Pieds around, Sooty are a bit harder to find, and hard to get close to. There were maybe 15 or 20 in this area. I liked this photo because it has 4, maybe a family group?

Sooty Oystercatcher (Haematopus fuliginosus) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Sooty Oystercatcher (Haematopus fuliginosus) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Finally to the end of this post, but one last bonus before I go. Upgrade on my Yellow Wattlebird (endemic to Tasmania). This was a very special and welcome visitor to our apples - you will get an overload in best photos next week! For those familiar with the Red Wattlebird, check the size of the wattles on these guys! These photos are not cropped and taken through the window!

Yellow Wattlebird (Anthochaera paradoxa) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Yellow Wattlebird (Anthochaera paradoxa) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

karentwemlow
karentwemlow's picture

Love your photos Dale! And how cute is that little fluffed up Musk Lorikeet :-)

Alex Rogers
Alex Rogers's picture

Some great photos, Dale, and fantastic to see all those local Tassie birds. That Yellow Wattlebird has wattles that put our Red's to shame! And the Crescent Honeyeater is gorgeous. Never too many pics, keep posting them up :-) 

sue818
sue818's picture

Some wonderful photos, Dale which makes it hard to pick a favourite... love the Crescent HE ant the Musk Lorrikeets but nice of you to select tones to match the Common Starling to your apple tree, I want an apple tree in my yard judging by the birds. Well done & always happy to see a number of shots, thanks for sharing them.

AbbyGrace
AbbyGrace's picture

What a great set of photos Dale! Got to love Pelican shots. But that Yellow Wattlebird is awesome! Nearly worth a trip to Tassie to see it. :) And I do like your Crescent Honeyeater shots too, saw them today properly for the first time, which was neat!

dwatsonbb
dwatsonbb's picture

Thanks all for your kind comments. Funny, hadn't seen many Yellow Wattlebirds which I could get a photo of, now they are showing up in my backyard. Perhaps I just wasn't looking enough - the study/office is only a new addition.

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

Devster
Devster's picture

Love them Dale! My favourite is the male Crescent Honeyeater. I managed a photo of female a few years ago when I was there but no male. Also love the Musk Lorrikeet as they are a species I haven't photographed yet. Look forward to more pics!!

TommyGee
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Great photos Dale :) that Yellow Wattlebird has gravitas for sure!

dannyka6
dannyka6's picture

Some beautiful Tassie specials that I'd love to see this year!! That apple tree is doing the trick attracting beautiful bird life. I just love the musk lorikeets, and the black-faced cormorant is a really lovely shot. Keep the shots coming! 

dwatsonbb
dwatsonbb's picture

Thanks to everyone for your kind comments. More coming soon, I promise, just need time to sort through a huge number of photos, hopefully a few birds new to most of you!

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

dwatsonbb
dwatsonbb's picture

So Mother's day I was offered the chance to do a Pelagic trip out of Pirate's Bay on the Tasman Peninsula, southeast of Hobart. The trip was hosted by Rohan Clarke, who is an expepert in the field of seabirds.

37 species sighted for the day (group of 11 ppl), unfortunatley I did not see or photograph them all. Some of the Albatross I will group, as I cannot confirm some species (Wandering 3 separate species and more if you count ssp. - I know we not counting ssp.)

So here are my efforts - lots of new birds to me, some I would have seen, but not been able to identify. Alot of EBCs and some I am definenatley happy with.

An excellent way to practice birds in flight - moving boat on 2-3 metre swell, birds literally just breezing on by. You could almost touch some of the albatross from the back of the boat, they were that close!

Left Pirate's Bay at 7am. after a 2 hour drive, back ashore at 3pm.

44. Australasian Gannet - seen many before never gotten a photo.

Australasian Gannet (Morus serrator) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Australasian Gannet by Dale Watson, on Flickr

45. Buller's Albatross - again have seen and photographed, but never seen so many - 124 (not counted by me).

Buller's Albatross (Thalassarche bulleri bulleri) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Buller's with a bonus Shy (I will put a separsate photo for Shy)

Buller's and Shy by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Buller's Albatross2 (Thalassarche bulleri bulleri) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

46. Shy Albatross - again a few ssp., so I will group just as Shy

Shy Albatross (Thalassarche cauta) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Shy Albatross4 (Thalassarche cauta) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Shy Albatross3 (Thalassarche cauta) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Shy Albatross2 (Thalassarche cauta (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

47. Southern Royal Albatross - both Southern and Northern were seen, but unfortunately I didn't get a photo of the Northern (unless I can ID from a group shot).

Southern Royal Albatross (Diomedea epomophora) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Another of this 1 with less PP. I like them both, but think the 2nd is more natural?

Southern Royal Albatross3 Diomedea epomophora by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Southern Royal Albatross1 (Diomedea epomophora) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

48. Wandering Albatross - again not going down to the different species or ssp, because I can't clearly identify. Might add a few once they can be sorted.

Immature - there were many different colour variations, which I am told can ID species and age - I don't have the Phd, so I not going to try.

Wandering Albatross (Diomedea exulans) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Wandering Albatross (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Wandering Albatross1  (Diomedea exulans) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Wandering Albatross1 by Dale Watson, on Flickr

49. Sooty Albatross - only a brief flyby, I believe there were 2 for the day. There was also a "Lightly Mantled Sooty" which unfortunatley I missed seeing.

Sooty Albatross (Phoebetria fusca) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

50. White-chinned Petrel - you can clearly see the white chin, which is only very small, and often not visible.

White Chinned Petrel (Procellaria aequinoctialis) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Merlin also tells me this is a White-chinned, but I can't see the white chin, was hoping for it to be a Southern Great Petrel, still hoping!

White-chinned Petrel2 (Procellaria aequinoctialis) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

51. Great-winged Petrel, with a bonus Southern Royal (I think - can't see the leading edge of the wing).

Great-winged1 Petrel (Pterodroma macroptera) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

52. Northern Giant Petrel - very common, more so than the Southern Giant on this day.

Northern Giant-Petrel2 (Macronectes halli) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Northern Giant-Petrel (Macronectes halli) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

A crop of the Great Northern, I like this photo.

Northern Giant-Petrel3 (Macronectes halli) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

53. Cape Petrel a pretty little bird, fast and flighty.

Cape Petrel1 (Daption capense by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Cape Petrel (Daption capense) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

54. Short-tailed Shearwater - there are still quite a few who haven't migrated yet, some will over-winter here. The size comparison doesn't work when the Albatross is much further away.

2 birds by Dale Watson, on Flickr

55. White-fronted Tern - new bird for me, have a few EBC photos, but this is the best I think.

White-fronted Tern (Sterna striata) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

White-fronted Tern2 (Sterna striata) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

56. Fairy Prion - one of several species sighted, but not by me! This is a definite EBC.

Fairy Prion (Pachyptila turtur) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

A bonus Crested Tern - I like this photo, they are hard to get in flight (well for me anyway)

Greater Crested Tern (Thalasseus bergii) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Another extra - Kelp Gull juvenile.

Kelp Gull (Larus dominicanus) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

Devster
Devster's picture

Oh wow, that looks like it was an amazing trip! I did eaglehawk neck a few years ago and it was the best Pelagic I have ever been on. We certainly didn't get that many variety of Albatross though. It is tough trying to stand still and take photos of birds in flight while the boat is rocking. Well done. I often get many photos of just a wing or even just water on these Pelagics. Thank Goodness for digital!

sue818
sue818's picture

Wow Dale, some great shots from the Pelagic tour... love the Buller's Albatross. That looks like a lot of fun with spectacular birds. I have yet to experience one... the closest i managed was on acruise trip past the Cocos Keeling Islands and I did not have my usual camera!. I also love the Yellow Wattlebird upgrades... your home office is paying dividends.

AbbyGrace
AbbyGrace's picture

Wow! That looks like an amazing trip, Dale. What a wonderful set of photos!

dwatsonbb
dwatsonbb's picture

Thanks all. I came home with many photos of sky, water and even the boat deck, with not a bird to be seen. Many photos of waves in focus, with crap bird photos. These trips are fantastic, something I would recommend to anyone who has the opportunity.

Reports from recent trips would have given me 26 lifers (if I could get the photo). Hoping to go again soon, if the wallet and the wife will allow!

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

karentwemlow
karentwemlow's picture

Wow what a fantastic day out and great weather by the look of it? I don't think I have seen any of these birds before, I don't get anywhere near the water (except the Hawkesbury River) very often. Maybe you can go again on fathers day :-) 

dwatsonbb
dwatsonbb's picture

Thanks Karen it was a great day, fine weather, and only a small swell. I have since been again, but still sorting through way too many crap photos, but will have some nice birds up shortly (maybe still some EBC photos tho).

Anyway, a recent fishing trip was almost at an end, we were pulliing our net, when my mate spotted these beauties, a pair of White-bellied Sea-eagles. A bird I see quite often, but usually hard to get close enough to on a moving boat. The 1st shows the pair social distancing (or maybe had an argument), the others are heavily cropped.

edit; the last photo is from my recent Pelagic, still sorting photos, and is one of the biggest crops I have done - maybe 800 metres away (and not with the P900). 

57. White-bellied Sea-eagle - taken with the Nikon P900, hate the viewfinder, had many shots of birds (mostly out of the frame).

White-bellied Sea-Eagle pair (Haliaeetus leucogaster) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

White-bellied Sea-Eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

White-bellied Sea-Eagle 1 (Haliaeetus leucogaster) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

White-bellied Sea-Eagle in flight (Haliaeetus leucogaster) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

AbbyGrace
AbbyGrace's picture

Stunning shots of the White-bellied Sea-Eagle Dale.

Devster
Devster's picture

You've done very well for a large crop Dale. Still plenty of detail. 

sue818
sue818's picture

Lovely shots of the WB Sea-eagle, Dale. Great detail as Dev said for a big crop. I am amazed at how still you could stand on a boat!

dwatsonbb
dwatsonbb's picture

Thank you all for your kind comments. I love WBSEs, they are frustratingly hard to get close to, but I will keep trying.

It is not hard to stand still on the boat (you move with the boat), but hard to keep the bird in the frame, with a moving boat, particularly on the P900

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

Alex Rogers
Alex Rogers's picture

Dale, what a great trip! And I think you may be in line for the record on the most unique birds this year with that haul :-) I'd love to do one of those pelagics - there are some off NSW, but you get a much better variety of birds off your colder waters. Next time I come to Tassie I'll do it for sure. You got some great shots, I know how difficult BIF are anyway, let alone from a little boat!

dwatsonbb
dwatsonbb's picture

Finally got to process photos from another Pelagic on June 1st. 23 species sighted on the day, only 3 new birds for my list. Another great day in overcast and trying conditions. A few extra photos to make up for the lack of new birds.

58. Westland Petrel - we saw this on my 1st trip, but I didn't get a clear enough photo even for an EBC, Thes are EBCs, but you can clearly see the distinguishing black tip on the bill.

Westland Petrel (Procellaria westlandica)2 by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Same photo - lightend up a bit for detail, perhaps too much exposure. Still playing with post processing.

Westland Petrel (Procellaria westlandica) (2) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Westland Petrel (Procellaria westlandica) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

59. Southern Giant-Petrel - again saw on the 1st trip, but no photo - will put another Great Northern in to show the bill colour difference (Nothern has a pinkish tip, Southern more grey/greenish).

Southern Giant-Petrel (Macronectes giganteus) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

The Northern Giant-Petrel fo comparison, I like this photo anyway.

Northern Giant-Petrel2 (Macronectes halli) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Westland Petrel (Procellaria westlandica) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

60. Southern Fulmar - a bird which apparently breeds in the summer Antarctic environs, moving north for the winter. There have been a lot sighted around South East Australian waters in recent weeks. For me, I was initially excited to see one, but at one stage there were 17 sitting/flying at the back of the boat. In the end they got in the way a bit, as they are very competative for food. Again possibly too many photos, but you can always stop looking!

Almost chopped this one out of the bottom of the frame.

Southern Fulmar (Fulmarus glacialoides) (3) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Southern Fulmar (Fulmarus glacialoides) (2) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Southern Fulmar (Fulmarus glacialoides) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Southern Fulmar (Fulmarus glacialoides) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Finally a couple of bonus photos of birds previously listed.

Cape Petrel - I think better maybe, certainly able to get closer this time.

Cape Petrel (Daption capense) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

This a little over exposed, but shows details better I think.

Cape Petrel (Daption capense) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Juvenile Kelp Gull in flight.

Kelp Gull by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

dwatsonbb
dwatsonbb's picture

So while processing the Pelagic photos, I was pleased to see another visitor to the apples - viewed through a not so clean window, not as sharp as I would like, but still a new bird for the year. We see these very regularly, but are not always cooperative.

61. Green Rosella - endemic to Tasmania, but fairly similar to some mainland species,

Green Rosella (Platycercus caledonicus) (1) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Green Rosella (Platycercus caledonicus) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Green Rosella (Platycercus caledonicus) (2) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

Devster
Devster's picture

Wow some more great photos. I think all those Pelagic photos would be lifers for me. I have to get down there again sometime and do that again. Love the Green Rosellas!

sue818
sue818's picture

Wow, Dale, what great shots! Love the Green Rosella but those pelagic tour birds are amazing. You certainly have managed to nail some flight shots but so many of those birds would be new to me. Congrats on a wonderful set!

dwatsonbb
dwatsonbb's picture

Thanks Dev and Sue. I have been enjoying my pelagic opportunities. Having you guys say those birds would be new for me, is pretty much how I think, when I see the wonderful variety being put up by all members involved with the challenge.

For me it is an absolute pleasure to see what others are seeing elsewhere, and I hope everyone feels the same way.

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

TommyGee
TommyGee's picture

Albatrosses and Petrels! What an amazing trip you must have had :) I love the detail on the Cape Petrel. 

dwatsonbb
dwatsonbb's picture

Thanks Tommy

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

AbbyGrace
AbbyGrace's picture

Wow Dale, what a nice set of birds/photos.

dwatsonbb
dwatsonbb's picture

Thanks Abby

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

dwatsonbb
dwatsonbb's picture

Was going to put a photo in for an upgrade, only to realise I haven't posted this one yet,

Seen in the same apple trees from my office window, but able to actually get outside and up close. It was keeping an eye on me, any sudden moves, would fly off only to return within a few seconds. I presume feeding on both the apple and any insects which might be present? More photos in "Best Photos", so I will limit them here.

Oh and at the bottom to complete the set of 3 endemics from home, another Yellow Wattlebird (these are the bullies - attack anyhting that comes at their meal time), and a repeat Green Rosella.

62. Yellow-throated Honeyeater - another Tassie Endemic. That is now 3 endemics feeding in our apples, pretty happy with that.

Yellow-throated Honeyeater (Nesoptilotis flavicollis) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Yellow-throated Honeyeater (Nesoptilotis flavicollis) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Yellow-throated Honeyeater (Nesoptilotis flavicollis) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Yellow Wattlebird - additional or upgrade maybe - taken this morning from the office.

YWB by Dale Watson, on Flickr

And a repeat Green Rosella - they were here today, but poor photos with a dull cloudy background, so I won't post them.

Green Rosella (Platycercus caledonicus) (2) by Dale Watson, on Flickr

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

sue818
sue818's picture

Beautiful, Dale! Great shots of all these birds. That apple tree is a great lure. Do you ever get to try the fruit?

Alex Rogers
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Your orchard is paying of fin spades :-) Love the Yellow Throated Honeyeater - what an amazing tongue he has! You can see him licking the nectar from the apple with it in the 2nd pic, and fully extended in the 3rd. 

dwatsonbb
dwatsonbb's picture

Thanks Sue, we eat the fruit from late Feb early March, pick as we need them up until mid May. Also given away quite a few. For small trees, they bear fruit really well. My best mate is an orchardist, so I get good advice. They are still alright to eat, but not enough to be bothered with now, happy for the birds to clean them up - they get really sweet when tree ripened. Funny though, they don't touch the Granny Smiths (great cooking apple).


Thanks Alex, the tongue is why I posted so many (heaps in best photos). Up until now, I have only had distant views, but this little one had no fear, although it was cautiously watching me. I think I will see it most days now, while the fruit lasts.

Just waiting for the Black Currawong to turn up, they are often heard in the bush near home, and I have seen them in my mates orchard a few kilometres away.

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

TommyGee
TommyGee's picture

Doing nicely with the endemics Dale. That Yellow Throated Honeyeater is a beauty.

karentwemlow
karentwemlow's picture

So many birds here that I've never heard of.... and how special to have them eating in your garden :-). 

Devster
Devster's picture

Love it Dale. That tongue shot is a cracker. Such a beautiful bird. The apple tree is certianly as asset to you and your garden.

dwatsonbb
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Thanks all, still hoping for a few new visitors, but happy to have the same ones return.

Dale Huonville, Tasmania

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