Cape York

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sue818
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Cape York

Off to Cape York in August this year and wondered if there were any tips on birding. We will be a bit limited as travelling with a group of others but they know two of us are birders. In Weipa for a couple of days before heading off. Also apparently doing a day trip to Thursday Island.

Sue

pacman
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Hello Sue - I hoptot be doing a Cape York tour in September so I cannot help yet

there should be a review of Lloyn Nielsens new book in the June edition of Warbler

I seem to recall a recent birding-aus posting on a Cape York tour is probalbly the most help

Peter

HelloBirdy
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The ebird hotspot map may help. You can zoom in and click on the markers to see what has been recorded there

Ryu
Canberra
Aiming for DSLR-quality shots with a bridge camera

sue818
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Finally home from Cape York and managed a few birds which I will post elsewhere. Not as many as expected for a number of reasons. There was limited free time with setting up camp and my left ankle was in a CAM boot as I broke it and dislocated my right shoulder a week before we left. It made birding somewhat difficult as no way could I come up quietly or hold a long lens.

Peter, you are probably already on your way to Cairns but thought I should warn you about the sandflies. Best efforts and home mixes plus high DEET repellents did not keep them all away. Near the beach, they were numerous and bit people through the flyscreen if close enough. Other places there appeared to be no problem with sandflies or mozzies.

It was a great trip with much learned about 4WD driving on the Old Telegraph road and its numerous creek crossings. Palm Cockatoos were seen at Punsand Bay and Moreton Telegraph station. Had a large Frogmouth calling over the tent one night at Punsand Bay and found 3 smaller ones in a low tree next morning. Moreton was probably my favourite spot for birds as we finally found a bit of free time and they were easy to locate. Definitely worth a visit but spend some time there.

On the drive up in early August, there was a lot of standing water alongside the roads but very few birds to be seen... 3 couples travelled different roads and all commented on the scarity of wildlife. Coming back there was even more water with flooding in some areas and the birds remained scare. The best areas were the Common at Townsville and the botanic gardens at Goondiwindi.

Sue

Woko
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Staff at Orpheus Island swore that they kept the sand flies away by eating lots of vegemite. In fact, a large jar of the stuff stood permanently open on the kitchen table. 

sue818
sue818's picture

Understandable as I just cannot bear the stuff!

Reflex
Reflex's picture

sue818 wrote:

Understandable as I just cannot bear the stuff!

Couldn't agree more!

I can only think of two things that I just cannot, even for all the tea in China eat ( I am not including some Asian dishes in this comment). One is Vegemite. The other is Promite.

Equally disgusting and although I love peanuts is Peanut Butter. It reminds me of something my sisters cat left on the carpet once and can't shake that image.

 As for the dreaded Sand fly. Of all the insects that bite human’s sand flies are probably the most widespread and definitely one of the most irritating.

The Department of Medical Entomology at Sydney University states that - “There are no known efficient methods of controlling biting midges” (sandflies) and “irritation associated with bites may be alleviated with anti-pruritic preparations, but severe reactions may require medical treatment with antihistamines.”

The Byron Bay Council states that –“no effective treatment process exists to prevent these insects breeding and travelling to the nearest “blood meal”…the best remedies for such pests appear to be to keep residences from being located close to breeding sites. Only tropical repellents and screening of buildings can provide a measure of protection to humans.”

 

Samford Valley Qld.

sue818
sue818's picture

My husband had not a single bite! The same thing happened on Fraser Island so I assume my blood is sweeter or the skin softer.

Wear long sleeves, stay inside from dusk on and spray inside the tent or room seem the only things that you can do. The itch was  was only slightly relieved by antihistamines and lignocaine creams

Still the trip was worth the discomfort.

Reflex
Reflex's picture

A couple of shots from our trip in 2013.

Plenty of Saltwater crocs in the cape. This was taken just north of Weipa.

I can't remember exactly where this taken but it was expensive all the way up to Bamaga.

The last crossing on the telegraph track heading north, Nolan's Brook. I am still getting red dust out of my car now, three years later.

Samford Valley Qld.

sue818
sue818's picture

Our dearest fuel was 157 cents/L at Bamaga...$174! Nolans Brook was lower although the ramp in was sharp with a twist to the left. Logans was the highest water as seen below.

Palm Creek was our introduction to such crossings but we breezed through with the tour leader instructing out party. Steep learning curve! First pic is the way in and next is the way out with no alternatives. There were 6 cars in our party.

Reflex
Reflex's picture

Great photos Sue. It is bringing it all back to me. Palm Creek is a terrible introduction to the telegraph track, even worse with a trailer on and at the time I seriously had second thoughts about the wisdom of this trip.

 I agree Logans crossing was the worst and very scarey. And it doesn't help that the water is murky and the whole area looks like a croc habitat - however there are no croc signs unless I have missed one, and people do walk it to check the bottom, which is a smart thing to do for the sake of saving your vehicle. 

Great part of the world.

Samford Valley Qld.

Devster
Devster's picture

Would love to visit that part of the world one day and not just for the birds!

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