Help ID this Bird

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fishy
fishy's picture
Help ID this Bird

Hi All,

Can someone please help me ID this bird.

Gelmir
Gelmir's picture

G'day fishy,
It's a New-Holland Honeyeater. They look very similar to the White-cheeked Honeyeaters, except the WCHE's have a large white cheek patch and a dark eye.

fishy
fishy's picture

Thanks for that ... now I can do some research on the bird.

Also, I'm pretty such that this bird is the Rainbow Lorikeet

And is this bird a falcon?

DenisWilson
DenisWilson's picture

Hi Fishy
Yes - Rainbow Lorikeet
Lat two shots almost certainly a Collared Sparrowhawk.
Brown Goshawks is very similar, generally, but you looks fine in features, and therefore probably at male. They are very small, elegant Hawks.
Cheers
Denis

fishy
fishy's picture

The image of the Collared SparrowHawk was taken just before it devoured a Laughing Dove in my backyard. I walked outside to see what I thought was two bird flirting mid flight. The laughing dove saw me a flew for me but ended up flighting straight into a window. I attempted to help fend the Collared SparrowHawk off but he outwitted me and ended up with Dove.

fishy
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*The laughing dove saw me and flew for me but ended up flying straight into a window.

DenisWilson
DenisWilson's picture

Interesting story, Fishy.
.
If I were you I would encourage this fine raptor to catch any Laughing Doves and Indian Mynas. It is after all, a bird-catcher by nature. It might as well eat introduced species.
.
Shame you don't have an image of the Sparrowhawk with its meal. For one thing it would confirm the ID, through a size comparison.

Denis

magpie
magpie's picture

Nice photos. Would be nice having a raptor land on your windowsill.

Unfortunately many pigeons have a disease which passes on to raptors so the more of them they eat the more likely they are to contract it.

Anonymous

what disease is that?

magpie
magpie's picture

Trichomoniasis / canker

Often called 'frounce' in birds of prey.

I've had to rescue owls that could not even lift their head up due to advanced spread of this disease in their body. They have to be euthanased. It's horrible.

Anonymous

thanks very much for that info!

Anonymous

also wanted to say it's a good example of a 'hidden' impact of an introduced animal, which most people would probably have thought of as benign
just because something isn't a predator doesn't mean it doesnt impact other animals....

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