Cockatiel

Did you know?

The Cockatiel does not have the screeching voice of many other parrots and may learn to 'speak'.

Calls
Although mostly silent, the Cockatiel gives a long and distinctive "queel-queel" in flight. It does not have the screeching voice of many other parrots and may learn to 'speak'.
Facts and Figures
Research Species: 
No
Minimum Size: 
30cm
Maximum Size: 
33cm
Average size: 
32cm
Average weight: 
90g
Breeding season: 
Normally July to December in south of range
Clutch Size: 
2 to 9, usually 5
Incubation: 
19 days
Nestling Period: 
30 days
Conservation Status
Federal: 
NSW: 
NT: 
QLD: 
SA: 
VIC: 
WA: 
Basic Information
Scientific Name: 
Featured bird groups: 
Atlas Number: 
274
What does it look like?
Description: 

The Cockatiel is an unusual member of the cockatoo family. It is small in size, and has a slender body and long pointed tail, which is more characteristic of the smaller parrots. Its plumage is mostly grey, paler below, with a white wing patch, orange cheeks and a distinctive pointed crest. The male can be identified by its bright yellow forehead, face and crest. Young Cockatiels resemble the adult female, although the young males usually have a brighter yellow face. The Cockatiel is not found naturally in any other country, but is a popular cage bird, second only to the Budgerigar, Melopsittacus undulates.

Where does it live?
Distribution: 

The Cockatiel is widespread throughout mainland Australia, but is uncommon in Tasmania, with only a few sightings being reported to date.

Habitat: 

The Cockatiel is seen in pairs or small flocks, in most types of open country, usually near water. It is common throughout its range, especially in the north and the more arid inland areas.

Seasonal movements: 

Throughout its range, the Cockatiel is strongly nomadic, moving around in response to the availability of food and water.

What does it do?
Feeding: 

Cockatiels feed on a variety of grass seeds, nuts, berries and grain. They may feed either on the ground or in trees, and always in small to large numbers. Cockatiels roost in trees near water and travel from these areas in large flocks to feeding grounds.

Breeding: 

Cockatiels may breed at any time, in response to suitable periods of rain, especially in the more arid regions. Both sexes share the incubation of the eggs, which are laid in a hollow, high up in trees. Suitable trees are either in or close to water. Cockatiels enter the nest hollow tail first.

Subscribe to me on YouTube